Employee EngagementAsk most human resource professionals what’s on their minds (outside of what’s for lunch?) and they are usually concerned with how well the company is doing with employee engagement.

Why is this factor so important nowadays?

First off, employee engagement is the pathway to a more motivated and productive team. Secondly, high levels of employee engagement indicates that the workplace is offering more than just a paycheck. In other words – employee engagement is a symptom of a company that is providing an above-average experience for employees and, in return, this leads to higher earning potential for the company.

Employee Engagement Works for Everyone 

It’s a win-win situation for employers and employees alike when engagement abounds. Employees are gleefully providing their skills, knowledge, and manpower (well most are). This translates to larger investments made by the company in the satisfaction levels of all employees. Those who get this right have loyal employees who would walk through fire for them.

Now it’s time to rate yourself: How well is your company at when it comes to employee engagement? Meh…not so perfect…maybe could use some improvement? You are not alone – many companies could be doing a better job with this.

Ideas for Increasing Employee Engagement Levels 

To help you get on the right track, here are some easy ways to increase employee engagement in your organization.

#1 – Give employees rewarding assignments

The number one rule for increasing employee engagement is giving them work that is personally rewarding and professionally attainable. Employees need a challenge that they can handle. Dull, meaningless projects only cause employees to lose interest fast.

#2 – Offer employees above average compensation

You want engagement from your employees? How about starting where it counts, with fair salaries and great benefits? People are the best asset your business has, so stop being cheap and pay them well for their efforts before a competitor nabs them.

#3 –  Know when to improve skill-sets

There comes a time on every team when the work skills start to become a bit outdated and the need for training comes into sight. Giving your employees generous training and educational incentives can help skills stay fresh and motivate them to new innovations.

#4 –  Stop it with the micro-managing madness

We are all adults in the working world, so why do so many managers think it’s okay to micro-manage people to the point of lunacy? Have some respect for employees and allow them to self-manage their way to success.

#5 – Vastly improve the work environment

Boosting employee engagement often begins with changing up the work environment. Try updating meeting spaces with comfortable chairs, tables, and soothing lighting. Over time, you will notice happier employees who are cheerfully working together.

#6 – Create some low cost incentives at work

Perhaps one of the best ways to improve employee engagement is to provide incentives to employees. This does not have to cost a fortune. Instead, come up with at least five ideas for low-cost perks that you can offer to employees now.

#7 – Share the successes with employees

A big part of running a successful business is allowing employees to understand their part in the puzzle. Whenever your company has landed a large client or celebrated an industry success this should be shared with all employees in the form of bonuses, a party, and other ways of saying thanks.

#8 – Regularly recognize industry excellence

What most employees are looking for is a workplace where they are appreciated on a regular basis. Make it an effort to take the time to recognize employees for what they contribute to not only your workplace, but the industry as a whole. This can go far in terms of creating harmony and productivity for your organization.

When you follow the above tips you will be sure to create a workplace that is happier, more productive, and filled with engaged employees who are willing to go the extra mile towards your company’s success.

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Written by Tess C. Taylor, PHR – Founder of The HR Writer and HR Knows, an HR content, coaching and consultancy firm in New York. Like this article? Please feel free to link to it and share it with your networks! You can also follow Tess on LinkedIn and Twitter

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